Today’s letter – healthcare reform needs our support, but I’m not that generous

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

During the election, then-candidate Barack Obama said about the gays, “it is wrong to hold up a line from Leviticus [condemning gays] while forgetting the whole point of the Sermon on the Mount [where Jesus teaches you to treat your neighbor as you treat yourself.]”

Then on Friday, the Administration released a memo defending Don’t Ask Don’t Tell on the grounds that homosexuality is, among other falsehoods, equivalent to incest.

Well, I am not willing to forget the Sermon on the Mount either. If President Obama wants me to respect him, he needs to respect me. The minion in the DOJ who put out this release needs to loose ALL of her Federal benefits along with her job. The dodo in the White House Press Office who defended the memo needs to loose ALL of his Federal benefits along with his job. And Michelle needs to make Barack sleep on the couch until he demands congress provide comprehensive and indistinguishable equality in employment, taxation, social security and immigration to every American citizen.

I would love to contribute to the Democrats’ health care reform plan – but all my spare change is going to fix the lies Mr. Obama is spreading.

Sincerely,

Today’s letter – regrets from another victim of the battle over gay marriage

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

After Tuesday’s press conference I had a coffee with one of the national reporters who covered the event, off camera and off record.

Covering this has been challenging for him because he has seen how hurtful Prop 8 is, and how thoughtless the Opponents of Equality are. While he is trained to be fair and balanced, he has started to see the denial of freedom as a media stunt, rather than the truth.

Basically, I met somebody who regrets spreading the lies and selfish policies of the Opponents of Equality, another victim of the war against the gays.

Governor, I wish you would apologize for vetoing AB 43, the Religious Freedom and Civil Marriage Protection Act that would have legalized gay marriage through the legislature. I wish you would apologize for letting Gavin Newsome and Antonio Villaraigosa stand alone at rally after rally opposing Prop 8. I wish you would make the GOP get rid of Michael Steele and Rush Limbaugh so Republicans can be electable again.

I wish you were on the side of Faith, Family and Freedom, instead of quietly waiting out your term.

Sincerely,

Today’s letter – everybody was there to oppose prop 8, except you

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

My husband, kids and I went to the Repeal Prop 8 rally in West Hollywood last night. The entire West Hollywood City Government was there, the pastor from my Church gave a rousing invocation, Drew Barrymore and George Takei spoke from their hearts, Daniel Choi challenged the military by saying “I am gay” and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa promised in English and Spanish that Los Angeles would be fighting along with us to get rid of this bad proposition.

Why weren’t you there?

Sincerely,

Today’s letter – what is up with Oklahoma?

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

What is up with Oklahoma? As individual politicians incite what can only be described as xenophobia, guardians of equality remain silent.

Seventeen House Republicans refused to accept a goodwill copy of the Quran from the Ethnic American Advisory Council, based on the (incorrect) assumption that “Most Oklahomans do not endorse the idea of killing innocent women and children in the name of ideology.” The political fallout? None.

One law, HB1804, makes it illegal to provide education or health care to undocumented immigrants, including infants; requires police to check the immigration status of anyone “suspected” of being in this country illegally; makes it a felony to give an illegal immigrant a ride; forbids the issuance of birth certificates to a child if one parent was an illegal alien; and confiscates the property of anyone caught violating HB1804. There was not even a rally against this one – supporters are cowering in legitimate fear.

Then to ice the cake, Republican Rep. Sally Kern focused on gays and lesbians, calling them more of a threat “than terrorism or Islam,” and calling them – us – a “cancer.”

Kern did not apologize – she instead got a standing ovation shortly after her comments were made public. Kern explained “I told the people when I was running for this office that I was a Christian candidate and that I believed we were in a cultural war for the very existence of our Judeo-Christian values.” Values that killed Matt Shepherd. Nice values.

I am so happy to work and live in California, where all of our citizens are welcomed to fully participate in our economy and society. Thank you, Governor, for making and keeping it that way.

Sincerely,

Today’s stamp: “Oklahoma” plus a three-cent “USA” makeup stamp.

Today’s letter – everybody knows that it is time

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

A Field Poll of 1,052 registered California voters asked “Do you approve or disapprove of California allowing homosexuals to marry members of their own sex?” and for the first time since 1977 – when California’s law was changed to ban the unions – a majority answered that yes, they do support same-sex marriage.

As my Aunt wrote after she saw our story in the Chicago Tribune, “It’s about time.” The Wall Street Journal described it on their May 24 Opinion page, “Court Allows Gay Marriage: Tyranny or Its End?” And my Mayor, Antonio Villaraigosa said “It’s time for us to bring every American out of the shadows and into the light, and this decision does that here in California.

Personally, I’m hoping to marry my fiancée of eleven years in a couple of weeks, and my friends, family and church are on the edge of their seats.

Please, Governor, keep supporting the freedom to marry in our great state. Keep fighting against the amendment. And most of all, please do whatever you can to make sure marriages start as soon as possible and continue after November.

Yours,

Today’s letter – it’s a small world

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

With the recent disasters in Myanmar and Sichuan province, we are reminded that we are a large and diverse world.

The traditional, conservative South Pacific island paradise of Tahiti has a social custom that we might think is strange: parents will raise their eldest son as a girl. This is a great honor for both the parents and the child, because the “Mahu,” as they are called, have the most enviable characteristics of both the male and female.

“I am proud of being a Mahu because in Polynesia we belong and we are recognized in this society,” says Coco, a Mahu. “We belong in everyday life.”

Who has the authority to decide if and whom these people should marry in California? Is it you, Governor? Is it society? Or should it be the people who want to get married?

In California, you have made it your job to decide who can marry whom. Now that is a weird custom.

Yours,

Today’s letter – two great men

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

Two prominent black gay men are in the news.

John Amaechi is a former NBA player who came out of the closet in February 2007 and became a media sensation — as well as the target for ugly homophobic rants and jokes.

“You’ve got the black people stereotype,” says Amaechi, “that black people are strong, can jump high, are really quick and very masculine. Then because you’ve got this one stereotype of black people, that automatically means they can’t be gay, because you’ve got a different stereotype about what gay people are, both of which are absurd.”

Miles away, in Falls Church, Virginia, voters elected the state’s first black and openly gay person to take public office. City Councilman Lawrence Webb said “I hope my election opens the door for others to get involved in public service. It doesn’t matter if you’re gay or black or both. What matters is your dedication to building a better community and your willingness to work hard at it.”

What makes our country great is our Constitution that allows great people to rise to the level of their ability with a blind eye towards their gender, race, age and sexual orientation.

Unless, of course, they want to make the commitment of marriage. In that case, you step in and stop that playing field from being level, based on absurd stereotypes and arguments from those opposed to building a better community. And that’s just not nice.

Yours,

Today’s letter – the popular vote

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

Do you think civil rights should be decided by an emotional popular vote, or by the ultimate popular vote, the Constitution?

Every human rights victory we hold dear (like suffrage, apartheid, the United Nations and slavery) was installed by decree, not by popular vote.

Please help a pro-same-sex-marriage Supreme Court decision to stick in the law, and in the minds of the people. Please support the freedom to marry for all Californians.

Yours,

Today’s letter – Absolutly better

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

ABSOLUT Vodka has been running an advertising and branding campaign called ‘In An ABSOLUT World,’ visually answering the question “what if everything in the world were approached with the same ideals that ABSOLUT approaches vodka?”

The latest addition to this campaign proposes that, in a more perfect world, lesbian and gay couples would be able to choose marriage the same way that heterosexual couples can – in this case by “popping the question” in a sports arena.

But while I have the freedom to go to the liquor store and pick up a pint of perfection, I do not have the ability to go to my courthouse and get a marriage license.

I wish you would do your part to make the world a better place, and help all California families have the same freedom – the freedom to marry.

Yours,

Today’s letter – apology acceptable

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger –

A videotape recently surfaced from 1991 showing of a member of the Canadian parliament, Saskatchewan MP Tom Lukiwski, describing homosexual men as “faggots with dirt on their fingernails that transmit diseases.”

Mr. Lukiwski has apologized twice for his comments, and Prime Minister Stephen Harper said “I believe that when such apology and remorse is sought from an individual member, the generous and high-minded thing to do is to accept that apology.”

So whenever you are ready to apologize for your 2007 veto of AB 43, the bill that would have let me and my domestic partner finally get married, you can be sure I will be sufficiently generous and high-minded to accept it. But until you apologize, I reserve the right to be mean and bitter toward the person who would not let me have the one simple freedom that you and your wife enjoy so freely – the simple freedom to marry.

Yours,